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Descent of the Day Star
EchoesRemain

We mourn for you, O Day Star,
 1
you Son of Morning
 2
What caused you to stray
 3
from the gaze of eternal love?
 4
How could you stand
 5
face to face,
 6
eye to eye,
 7
with the One whose eyes envisioned
 8
universes,
 9
Whose eyes envisioned
 10
your existance
 11
before you ever even existed,
 12
and somehow think that you could outshine
 13
the Light that knows no darkness?
 14
You were his favorite;
 15
He loved you so...
 16
 
 
What made you wander
 17
from the safety you could have had,
 18
resting forever in the embrace
 19
of his burning heart?
 20
Instead you chose
 21
the cold black heart of the earth.
 22
You could have been infinite.
 23
You could have been someone we loved...
 24
 
 
How does it feel to be as low as it gets?
 25
As far removed from heaven
 26
as even hell dares to be distant?
 27
How does it feel to be hated?
 28
 
 
Oh Son of Morning, how we weep for you.
 29
Dear, dear Lucifer... how you have fallen.
 30


This is kind of based on a verse in the book of Isaiah in the Bible. Even if you don't believe in God or whatever, it's kind of something to think about... I don't know, I was just thinking about how sad satan must get sometimes. This is basically that passage written in a pity perspective, rather than the condemning one offered in Isaiah...

26 Jun 06


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Comments:

Oh, do read Dante's Inferno some time soon.  Lucifer steals the show, and goes on for a whole chapter on his motivations, aspirations and sorrows.  It might inspire you to continue in this line, or take this poem in a new direction.
This is good work.  I'll come back for a real critique when I'm awake, but thought I'd share this thought presently.
 — unknown

Reminds me of Orpheus and Eurydice - I thought it had more of a mythological feel to it than a biblical one. The voice is quite good - almost like a chiding mother - I think some of the language is a little prosaic, but I agree with the first critic - it has a lot of mileage in it for further development.
 — opal

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